Sunday, November 06, 2005

Alcohol in Foods & Cooking (part 1)

There are many recipes that use some form of alcohol as an ingredient in sauces, marinades or as a main flavor ingredient. Because even small amounts can trigger the allergy of alcoholics to alcohol, it is prudent to avoid eating or cooking foods that contain it. In most cases, you can make some non-alcoholic substitutions or you can find another recipe that doesn't use alcohol. In order to be successful with substitutions, however, you'll need to be armed with information and background on why the alcohol was originally used in the recipe.

Personally, I don't cook. But I do eat. Ocassionally. I recently attended a workshop that addressed the issues of alcohol in cooking. Over the next few days, I'll be posting more information on the subject, along with various substitution charts. Most of the information I will provide has been compiled by the U.S.D.A.

The holiday season is upon us. I'd hate to see any of us in recovery relapse by mistake.
Stay tuned.

11 comments:

Hannen said...

I know I have a list somewhere with substitutions. I'll send it to you. I love this stuff! Glad you made it through yesterday.

Grace said...

I have wondered if alcohol in cooked dishes doesnt count as it must evapourate off?

AAwoken said...

Here a whopper. Good Vanilla ice cream has alcohol. Vanilla extract is 35% alcohol. I read this somewhere on a govt website and was shocked. Alcohol is everywhere. Where I live all birthday cakes are high octane.

dAAve said...

Grace - keep coming back. read all the posts this week, this is the first in a series.

Mr. H.K. said...

I've always wondered about this. So I'll be reading with interest. I have friends in recovery and I'd hate to feed them something by accident...

Cheers,

Mr. H.K.
Postcards from Hell's Kitchen
And I Quote Blog

Ricky!!! said...

I ate some tiramisu last year. It was made with rum. I think the important thing is determining your triggers. OF course, I don't know much about this. Just kinda guessing on this one

Lee said...

I always wondered as well since I think most of the actual alcohol should be burned/cooked off but then that doesn't mean it won't set someone off. I know that with people with food issues sometimes even a small/trace amount can still be a possible problem.

Pat said...

Fruit juice contains a certain amount of naturally occuring alcohol. I eat lobster bisque in which an entire bottle of Cognac is used (and evaporated off). Nothing happens.

I avoid ice creams if there is booze in it, not because there is any danger of becoming intoxicated from it but just out of principal.

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